Marketing Called, It Wants Its Clothes Back

Brand positioning in your mind – and your clothes

Just kidding, keep your clothes on. See, I’m going to talk about the clothes you’re wearing… and brand positioning. Fashion statements are a great example of effective brand positioning. Brand positioning is the sum of values that a company wants its target audience to associate with it in order to set it apart from its competition, like a personality or a stereotype. Yes, brands also want to fit in and attract consumers so they have to incorporate traits we can identify with. A fashion statement is the name given to certain clothing that expresses an attitude or reflects a lifestyle of the person wearing it; successful fashion statements are easy to identify with due to their strong messages, like Ed Hardy and Ralph Lauren.

Next time you buy the latest fashion, remember: that’s marketing working its magic, claiming a spot on your mind and etching a brand on your brain. Of course, there are many more instances: buying a luxury car or a new gadget and so on. This doesn’t make you a robot or a follower; it’s just that we are social beings and we have to identify with others to live, to survive. A while back (before I was born), brands picked up on this and took advantage of this “weakness” by mirroring our behavior. However, it’s a double-edged sword, and brands must keep their standard and promises; consumers can (and will) be fierce when given the chance or reason to be.

As brands act and become more like our friends, a mutual relationship develops in which both consumers and brands benefit from better understanding, clearer expectations, and stronger bonds. Brand positioning helps establish a good rapport and trust between companies and consumers. You wouldn’t wear the clothes of a stranger, would you? But your friends, your closest buddies… maybe Zara or Armani, then you wouldn’t have a problem, right?

Is your relation with brands friendly?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s